Ghost

javadoodle:

Final Ride" illustration process. Art by Javadoodle.

tardistoaster:

raydelblau:

benedictedcumberbabeof221:

petition for the next companion to not be a white girl in her 20s who crushes on the Doctor 

petition for the next companion to be a grumpy chinese-american grandma who complains about plot-holes and knits the doctor horrific time-travel-themed sweaters to wear when she thinks it’s cold out (most of the time)

reblogging because this is the best idea ever

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”
"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”

"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

nerdynauticalgirl:

khanandkittens:

I just made myself sad. 

Right in the feels

nerdynauticalgirl:

khanandkittens:

I just made myself sad. 

Right in the feels

txn:

my favorite picture ever

txn:

my favorite picture ever

(Source: texn)

JESUS CHRIST.
YOU DUMB BASTARD.

(Source: northernbluetwo)

Juice / Chibs + happier times

(Source: boredyet)

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